Physical Activity, Manual Therapies, and Recovery

Physical Activity, Manual Therapies, and Recovery

The musculoskeletal system is one of the most critical components of how we interact with our environment. It gets us where we need to go, supports us, and protects our most essential vital functions. Physical activity and exercise are cornerstones of disease prevention and maintenance. However, in order to keep our body in proper motion we need to pair our movement with optimal recovery and repair. Our research in physical activity, manual therapies, and recovery is dedicated to enhancing our understanding of these processes and identifying key benefits.

PAST
Projects

View Past Projects

Examining the Role of Expressive Writing to Improve Resilience

(Duke funded) This study found that a 6-week expressive writing-to-heal seminar significantly improved resilience, perceived stress, rumination, and depression in individuals who had recently experienced an emotional or physical trauma. You can learn more about the study at ClinicalTrials.gov.

EMBARK VA: Exploring Massage Benefits in Arthritis of the Knee for VA Healthcare Users

(NIH/NCCIH funded) The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness and feasibility of an 8-week course of Swedish massage is for reducing pain and increasing function in adults who are VA health care users with osteoarthritis of the knee. You can view more information about this study at ClinicalTrials.gov.

EMBARK: Exploring Massage Benefits in Arthritis of the Knee

(NIH/NCCIH funded) EMBARK is the largest NIH-funded clinical trial on massage for osteoarthritis of the knee to date. In collaboration with Rutgers and Yale, this randomized controlled trial compared the effectiveness of Swedish massage and light touch bodywork in reducing pain and increasing function of adults with osteoarthritis of the knee. Enrollment is now complete for this study. You can view more information about the study at ClinicalTrials.gov.

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OUR
Publications

Teaching yoga to seniors: essential considerations to enhance safety and reduce risk in a uniquely vulnerable age group

Krucoff C, Carson K, Peterson M, Shipp K, Krucoff M. Teaching yoga to seniors: essential considerations to enhance safety and reduce risk in a uniquely vulnerable age group. J Altern Complement Med. 2010; 16(8): 899-905.

Massage therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized dose-finding trial

Perlman A, Ali A, Njike V, Hom D, Davidi A, Gould-Fogerite S, Milak C, Katz D. Massage therapy for osteoarthritis of the knee: a randomized dose-finding trial. PLoS One. 2012; 7(2): e30248.

Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

Ali A, Kahn J, Rosenberger L, Perlman A. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis. Trials. 2012; 13: 185.

Complementary therapies for significant dysfunction from tinnitus: treatment review and potential for integrative medicine

Wolever RQ, Price R, Hazelton AG, Dmitrieva NO, Bechard EM, Shaffer JK, Tucci DL. Complementary therapies for significant dysfunction from tinnitus: treatment review and potential for integrative medicine. Evid Based Complement Altern Med. 2015. doi: 10.1155/2015/931418.

Pilot study of massage in veterans with knee osteoarthritis

Juberg M, Jerger K, Allen KD, Dmitrieva NO, Keever T, Perlman AI. Pilot study of massage in veterans with knee osteoarthritis. J Alt &Comp Med. 2015; 21(6): 333-8.

A combined patient and provider intervention for management of osteoarthritis in veterans: a randomized clinical trial

Allen KD, Yancy WS Jr, Bosworth HB, Coffman CJ, Jeffreys AS, Datta SK, McDuffie J, Strass JL, Oddone EZ. A combined patient and provider intervention for management of osteoarthritis in veterans: a randomized clinical trial. Ann Intern Med. 2016; 164(2): 73-83.

Want to be a part of our research?

Currently Recruiting

  • PRIMIER: Patients Receiving Integrative Medicine Interventions Effectiveness Study
  • Study Dates: None set
  • (Bravewell Collaborative funded) PRIMIER is an innovative registry study designed to help illuminate current “best practices” in integrative medicine. In collaboration with a network of integrative medicine clinics across the country, PRIMIER follows the impact of integrative medicine on patients over time. Individuals who have been seen at Duke Integrative Medicine are eligible to participate. For more information, please contact Elizabeth Matteson Bechard at 919-660-6762 or elizabeth.matteson@duke.edu. You can also view more information about the study at ClinicalTrials.gov.
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Funding

  • Bravewell Collaborative
  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) / National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health (NCCIH)